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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

5 edition of Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean found in the catalog.

Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean

by M. G. Smith

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Published by Dept. of Extra-Mural Studies, University of West Indies in Mona, Jamaica .
Written in English

    Places:
  • West Indies, British
    • Subjects:
    • Social classes -- West Indies, British -- Case studies,
    • Social structure -- West Indies, British -- Case studies,
    • Pluralism (Social sciences) -- West Indies, British -- Case studies,
    • West Indies, British -- Race relations -- Case studies

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby M.G. Smith. ; with a foreword by Rex Nettleford.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHN195.2.S6 S65 1984
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiv, 163 p. ;
      Number of Pages163
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2648615M
      ISBN 109766160007
      LC Control Number85229202

      “Gender, Race and Class in the Social Economy of the English-Speaking Caribbean.” Social and Economic Studies, & 3 (June/September ), “Export-processing Industry and the New Peripheralization of the Commonwealth Caribbean.” 21st Century Policy Review, . Studies of the Caribbean have been, in the main, con cerned with either slavery and its peculiar problems and institutions or with questions of economic development, or with the sociological problems of race, stratification, the family and lower class life. One can understand why this was so. In the Commonwealth Caribbean, a University of the.

      Race or Culture?Race and culture are two powerful and meaningful traits in humans, and both have strong affects on society through stereotypes and racism. The effects have been seen throughout history, but which is more important? The meaning of important in this sense is the one which has a greater effect on society, and the one which generally means more to the people of a certain social or. Chapter 4 of the book "Sociology for Caribbean Students: Society and Culture," Volume 1, is presented. It provides a background of how Caribbean culture developed by describing the influence made by people of different nationalities such as Africans, Chinese, and Indians.

        INTRODUCTION Over the past 20 years, Caribbean education has been through several reforms and changes, most of which have sought to address perceived deficits or problems in the system. In very few cases have these efforts sought to fundamentally rethink the function of education in society and articulate the goals of education with the re-shaping . A preface for this book should have been written in , when Education and Society in the Creole Caribbean, as project and manuscript, was completed. However, the untimely death of M.G. Smith that year, the principal investigator of the project, led.


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Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean by M. G. Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean. [M G Smith]. Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean by M.

Smith, Smith (undifferentiated),Dept. of Extra-Mural Studies, University of West Indies edition, in EnglishPages: Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Culture race and class in the commonwealth Caribbean in SearchWorks catalog Skip to search Skip to main content.

Author of Pastoral discipline and the church courts, Government in Zazzau, The plural society in the British West Indies, West Indian family structure, Poverty in Jamaica, Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean, Corporations and society, The Plural Society in the British West Indies.

Race and Caribbean Culture Words7 Pages Race and Caribbean Culture Each culture is unique in its attitudes about which groups within the cultural community will comprise the majority and which the minority. The culture also determines how the minority culture will be treated and how the two groups will be classified.

Smith, M.G. () Culture, Race and Class in the Commonwealth Caribbean. Mona, Jamaica: University of the West Indies, Department of Extra-Mural Studies. Google Scholar. "Since the s the study of gender issues as they relate to the Caribbean has gone through several reinterpretations. The respectable wife and mother stereotype was replaced by that of the 'powerful matriarch', which was in turn challenged by studies exposing the poverty and vulnerability of women, not only of Afro-Caribbean descent but Indian, white and coloured middle-class women.

A prolific writer, Smith authored or co-authored numerous books and articles on theory, on Northern Nigeria, and on the West Indies. The Smith corpus of social science publications, the M.G. Smith Archive, is on-line in26 books, 41 articles, 41 chapters, 21 reviews and 10 unpublished manuscripts of various lengths.

Greene, J.E. (ed.) () Race, Class and Gender in the Future of the Caribbean. Jamaica: ISER. Klass, M. (/88) East Indians in Trinidad: a Study of Cultural Persistence. The construction and representation of race and ethnicity in the Caribbean. Kingston, Jamaica: University of the West Indies Press.

The psychology of the child. New York: Basic Books. Google Scholar. Rey, G. Survival. Culture, race, and class in the Commonwealth Caribbean. Kingston, Jamaica: University of the West Indies. Classes and Castes. The upper class consists of wealthy business owners, corporate managers, professionals, high-ranking government officials, and some foreign citizens.

Historically, this class was composed of Britons, white Bahamians, light-skinned Bahamians of mixed race. 3 M. Smith, Culture, Race, and Class in the Commonwealth Caribbean (Jamaica: Uni-versity of the West Indies Press, ).

4 A. Trollope, The West Indies and the Spanish Main (New York: Hippocrene Books. The relationship between identity, race, culture, gender, sexuality and ethnicity in the Caribbean will also be explored.

Consequently, such concepts as creolisation, interculturation, creole identities, hybridity, essentialism, national and diasporic identities will be assessed. Rethinking Caribbean Differenceexplores the effects of race and ethnicity, class and linguistic variation on gender issues and gender ideologies in the Caribbean.

The papers in this issue include: Women's Organizations and Movements in Commonwealth Caribbean; InSearch of our Memory: Gender in the Netherlands Antilles; Gendered Testimonies: Autobiographies, Diaries and Letters by Women in. Culture, Race & Ethnicity questions.

How does culture define who a person is. What is your culture. Is this the same as your ethnicity. What is a common belief about race and how is it untrue. Identify some stereotypes you know of about a particular group of people.

Cultural Conundrums investigates the passions of race, gender, and national identity that make culture a continually embattled public sphere in the Anglophone Caribbean ics, journalists, and ordinary citizens have weighed in on the ideological meanings to be found in the minutiae of cultural life, from the use of skin-bleaching agents in the beauty rituals of working-class Jamaican Author: Natasha Barnes.

I do comparative-historical work on race/class/gender/sexuality in the English-speaking Caribbean, as well as more theoretically cast work on the political economy of globalization and postcolonialism, particularly in the Caribbean.

The Caribbean middle classes, because of their diverse characteristics, play a rather complex and controversial role in the maintenance and survival of the existing structures and culture of Caribbean racial formations. For example, while the tendency of some sections of the middle classes (particularly the business section) is to champion the.

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Studying how differently race and racism are understood in the Caribbean than in the United States allows us to argue confidently that race is a social construction and not a natural phenomenon. Further, it is possible to see how racialized hierarchies have been used to divide and control the oppressed class on behalf of the owning class.

Caribbean Islands Table of Contents. With the exception of Trinidad, where East Indians and Africans are nearly equal in number, the Caribbean states have predominantly African-derived populations. Race, ethnicity, class, and color, however, do not constitute the.

Abstract. Lorick-Wilmot presents a microanalysis of the habitus of blackness and the confluence of middle class-ness for the MSGCIs. Specifically, she examines social class in the United States, including its various sociological meanings and conceptions of mobility and the ways race, color and economic factors help determine one’s class position and status.

Commonwealth Caribbean music in the form of the calypso, reggae, ska, and steelband orchestra have captivated listeners around the world. Like the people themselves, art forms in the Caribbean demonstrate an eclectic variety harmoniously combining elements of European, African, Asian, and indigenous American traditions.